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Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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The original melody for this song was created by two Russian composers in 1926 from a Russian Gypsy Folk song as a "lost love" song, "On The Long Road." Gene Raskin (from New York) created a new set of lyrics in the 1960s as "Old Friends" ballad, "Those Were The Days," to which he copyrighted the lyrics as "made public with credits given to him."

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a free, web-based, music education resource that features Celtic, Folk, Old-Time, and Seafaring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture.
Visit the KelticDead Music website for more information and links.

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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This ballad was created in the latter part of the 17th Century about a notorious roadside robber (a highwayman) named Patrick Fleming. Patrick was born into an Irish potato farming family in Athlone, Ireland in the mid 1600s. At age 13, he went into service with Elizabeth Nugent, Countess of Kildare, but was soon removed after he discovered the priest in the household sleeping in an obscene position which caused a scandal. Before leaving the household, Patrick stole over 200 pounds and fled to join a gang located around Dublin. In his time, he maimed and killed many in his robberies, mostly English elites, but because the Irish were at odds with English Patrick was somewhat romanticized. Most highwaymen, when caught, were hung on the spot and while that was the fate of Patrick and his band as well, this “romantic” version of the robber was very popular as an “Irish” pub song. 

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a free, web-based, music education resource that features Celtic, Folk, Old-Time, and Seafaring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture.
Visit the KelticDead Music website for more information and links.

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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This seafaring song about whaling was created in the mid 1800s by a miller who never went to sea or was ever a whalerman. George Scroogie lived in the Aberdeen area in Scotland where the whaling industry was centered. His poem and song was very popular among seamen and whaler men. 

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a free, web-based, music education resource that features Celtic, Folk, Old-Time, and Seafaring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture.
Visit the KelticDead Music website for more information and links.

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

 

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To show how Celtic-Folk tunes and songs merge into other cultures in the world, this ballad, "Wraggle Taggle Gypsies" was originally created in Scotland in the time when there was a very strict ruling against "gypsies" living and working in the country. If caught they were executed on the spot. To avoid detection, they referred to themselves as a "Johnny Fey" or "Jockies." They lived "outside" of the cultures and were often confused with the "Travelers" who had a similar life style. One such Johnny Fey enticed a very young lady to abandon her station in life with her husband and her baby to live with the gypsies. The song eventually migrated into the Appalachian regions of the United States with the settlers there. "Doc Watson" was well known in folk music, and he created a version of the ballad as "Gypsy Davey." As a note, in the original ballad, when the Lord caught up with the band of gypsies, he killed them all, and instead of killing the wayward wife, he imprisoned her in a tower. A quick death would have been more merciful. The KelticDead Music Group plays this ballad with live instruments that are normally used in Celtic-Folk music sessions.

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a free, web-based, music education resource that features Celtic, Folk, Old-Time, and Seafaring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture.
Visit the KelticDead Music website for more information and links.

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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Dunmore Lasses (also known as "Road to Cnoc") is one of the mystery journey tunes that relate to mysterious places, standing stones, old castles, battle areas, and others where shey (fayrie) folk might be found. Michael Carroll joined the KelticDead Music Group to play his hammered dulcimer for this tune.  

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a FREE on-line, web-based music-education resource about Celtic, Folk, Old Time, and Seafaring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture. For more information about this initiative, visit www.KelticDead.com .

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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Turlough OCarolan was Ireland's most famous blind harpist in the late 17th Century into the 18th Century. At 16 he was blinded by smallpox, and yet continued on with his skills as a minstrel which in those days was a respected profession in Ireland. He composed SidheBeg, SidheMor as his first composition about an ancient battle that was fought in the area of his first patron, Squire Reynolds. The tune became his most popular and famous tune out of the more than 200 musical compositions he is accredited with in his lifetime. Our KelticDead Music Group plays a variant of this famous tune with live instruments commonly used in Celtic music sessions. The meaning of the tune is "spirit little, spirit large" and refers to the fayrie (mystery) world in the region of Lough Scur in Ireland where Squire Reynolds lived. As Gaelic had no written script in Turlough's day the spelling has many forms; SiBegSiMor, SheebegSheeMor, SighBegSighMor, and a few others.  Also visit the Current Broadside page in the KelticDead Music website.

It's all fun. Shaun, That KelticDead Guy
 

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a FREE on-line, web-based music-education resource about Celtic, Folk, Old Time, and Sea Faring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture. For more information about this initiative, visit www.KelticDead.com .

Shaun That KelticDead Guy


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This KDM Video selection is a variant of a Celtic Folk song from the 1700s.  I sang the ballad from a man's view set in the mid 1800s during a Potato Blight in Ireland, Scotland and England where millions of refugees crowded into port cities in hopes to escape death. Millions of girls and boys suffered starvation, disease, prostitution (as young as 10 years old), and imprisonment for even the slightest infraction. Because Eric Burdon (Animals) during the 1960s picked up on this Celtic ballad while on tour with Chuck Berry and adapted the song to what seemed like an American based ballad many thought it was an American Folk song for many years.

Our 
KelticDead Music Group (Myself, Earnie Taft, and Linda King) created lyrics (made public) to focus the theme of the KDM Broadside on these mid-1800 events and times. We arranged and played the tune with live instruments that are commonly found and used in Celtic music sessions. The KelticDead Music Initiative presents audio-video arrangements of Celtic, Folk, Old Time, and Seafaring tunes and songs that are now found throughout the world. Visit www.KelticDead.com . It's all free and all fun.

 

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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This instrumental is a pleasant, pastoral sound out of Ireland that is quite popular in many music session groups. Not much is known about the tune, except that it was written by a young man out of Irrul in County Mayo, Ireland known as "Freckled" Donal MacNamara. It's an ode by a young poet honoring the winds that blow across Munster, Connaught, and Mayo counties. Our KelticDead Music Group put this tune composition together using live instruments that are normally used in Celtic music. 

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a FREE on-line, web-based music-education resource about Celtic, Folk, Old Time, and Sea Faring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture. For more information about this initiative, visit www.KelticDead.com .

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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There are ancient markers in many parts of the world that signify a great mystery of the Earth. Standing stones, carns, old churches, and other structures are often at these center marker places or found along a path of a system of ancient "straight lines" that point to other centers of power/energy and these paths have proven to extend around the world. These paths are also called "ley lines." In many of these center places (still found in Europe and in Britain), you might find a marker on the ground or a carving or a stain glass image of St. George slaying the dragon. Even today, many groups participate in "walking" along these paths as a sort of pilgrimage to find a mysterious place where they might find "sighe" (shey) spirits or gain some understanding of the world and universe around them. There are several "mystery" tunes in the Celtic-Folk music genre, and they usually have "Road To" in their titles. The KelticDead Music Group arrangement created this tune as a progression where one instrument combines with others in their journey to one of these mysterious places, and as always the KDM Group plays this tune using live instruments that are normally used in Celtic music sessions. 

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a FREE on-line, web-based music-education resource about Celtic, Folk, Old Time, and Sea Faring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture. For more information about this initiative, visit www.KelticDead.com .

Shaun That KelticDead Guy

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The Carter Family was a key musical group in the early 20th Century, and one of the daughters, June Carter, later married Johnny Cash.  This American Folk/Old Time traditional song has been played and sung many ways, and even the Carter Family sang it from the differing perspectives from the man and then from the woman on occasion. The story is about a man going away to sea, but he tries to reassure the girl that he loves he will be faithful to her. Some believe that the tune may have originated out of the time of the War of 1812. The KelticDead Music arrangement blends the differing versions into one composition, and as always the KDM Group plays this tune using live instruments that are normally used in Celtic music sessions. 

The KelticDead Music Initiative is a FREE on-line, web-based music-education resource about Celtic, Folk, Old Time, and Sea Faring tunes, songs and stories that are now found throughout the world and in every culture. For more information about this initiative, visit www.KelticDead.com .